All Questions
A clinical trial is a research study that looks at ways of preventing, detecting, and treating disease...
Talk to your doctor about any questions or concerns you may have before deciding to enroll in a trial. Your doctor can also help you come up with important questions to ask the clinical trial team before you meet with them.
Before deciding to participate in a clinical trial, you will meet with the trial's research team to learn about the study...
Clinical trial programs may deploy nurses, phlebotomists, or other licensed healthcare providers directly to your home to deliver treatments or collect samples if necessary...
A home visit may be conducted by a health care professional other than your doctor (i.e., a nurse or nurse practitioner, a physician assistant, or healthcare technician).  You could take a telemedicine (telehealth) call from your study doctor at home using a desktop or tablet computer or a…
If you'd like to find clinical trials for your disease, you should talk to your doctor about available options. Additionally, there are resources available on the internet...
Individual study sponsors -- including pharmaceutical companies, medical institutions, and foundations -- typically pay for any treatments, special tests, or research costs specific to the clinical trial...
People participate in clinical trials for many reasons. Participants generally fall into two categories: Healthy volunteers and Patient volunteers.
Clinical trials are the primary way we determine whether experimental treatments are safe and effective. Increasing diversity better reflects the range of populations that will use the therapy, or vaccine, being studied...
Under the law, "basic results" for certain clinical trials must be submitted and published on ClinicalTrials.gov, generally no later than 1 year after the study Completion Date. (ClinicalTrials.gov) In many instances, study sponsors also share study results with participants via other mechanisms as…